Fatima Khan

Fatima Khan

Fatima Khan is a PhD candidate in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University. Her research explores children’s well-being in adverse contexts (i.e. conflict zones and disaster-struck areas) from historical, cultural, and psychosocial perspectives. By conceptualizing and understanding the trauma children face, she is interested in how drawings, as a participatory arts-based methodology, have been used and curated as a result of such adversity. In doing so, she aims to highlight some of the tensions and ethical issues that may arise when working with and exhibiting children’s drawings. Her work in the ATTSVE project has entailed producing a number of briefing papers on English Language Clubs, Cash Transfer Programs, and Serious Games as well as a toolkit on participatory visual methodologies for Agricultural Colleges in Ethiopia.



Kyla Brophy

Kyla Brophy

Kyla Brophy is a PhD student in Counselling Psychology at McGill University. She joined the ATTSVE project as an intern in summer 2018, when she had the opportunity to conduct focus groups, interviews, and workshops at 4 ATVETs in Ethiopia. This work has led to the development of a report on student perceptions of gender-based violence, as well as briefing papers on several key initiatives in ATTSVE’s gender-transformative programming (e.g., Cash Transfers, Gender Clubs, Women and leadership; available on the Resources page). ​

Kyla’s background is in community education and health promotion.  She has worked in the non-profit sector coordinating social justice education programs, including a gender-based violence prevention program in partnership with Status of Women Canada.  She later worked in hospital and community health settings supporting the transition to adulthood for youth with chronic illnesses and/or disabilities, and youth with connections to the foster care system.  Her doctoral research investigates self-compassion as a factor that promotes resilience and well-being, supervised by Dr. Annett Körner, a member of the Institute for Human Development and Well-being and Director of the Science and Practice in Psychology Research Lab.

Kyla says: “My involvement in ATTSVE’s in-country activities and ongoing knowledge mobilization has highlighted the important role of gender transformative programming in supporting and promoting well-being and human development.  I feel fortunate to be able to learn from the diverse perspectives and experiences of students, faculty, and ATTSVE team members in Ethiopia, and the team members at McGill and Dalhousie.

Kyla holds BAs in Political Science and Psychology from the University of British Columbia, a Certificate in Dialogue and Civic Engagement from Simon Fraser University, and an MSc in Gender (Research) from the London School of Economics.  In addition to her doctoral research, she facilitates workshops on self-compassion, mental health, and well-being with students, community groups, and professional organizations.


Sustainability in Gender and Language Activities, Sep. 16 to 20, 2019

Sustainability in Gender and Language Activities, Sep. 16 to 20, 2019

Sustainability in Gender and Language Trainings Program

Gender & Business Management Training, May 13-18, 2019

ATTSVE Gender & Business Management Training, May 13-18, 2019

Report by: Eleni Negash

One of the immediate outcomes of the project (1113) is to facilitate design and support implementation of sustaining Gender & language clubs mainstreaming at four ATVET Colleges. To achieve this outcome, designing and delivering short term  trainings  for ATVETS is one of the activities to be performed. Based on these gender training took place entitiled Gender equitable Bussiness planning and Management  from May  13  – 18. 2019 at  Addiss Ababa (Friendship  Hotel) .      

The aims and objectives of the training were :

  • How to sustain Gender and language clubs in four ATVETs;
  • Identify and implement gender-equitable and socially inclusive business practices through gender equality mainstreaming;
  • Understand the basis and practice of gender-equitable business planning and management;
  • Identify “income-generating business prospects through research and analyses;
  • Develop a good business model and plan;

Composition of Participants

No 

ATVETs

Participants

Total

F

M

1

Soddo

1

4

5

2

Maichew

2

3

5

3

Woreta

1

4

5

4

Nedjo

1

4

5

5

McGill

2

1

3

6

ICO

1

1

 

Total

8

16

24

  • Participants drawn from four ATVETs 2GFP + 2LFP & 1 IFO

Training opening procedures

The McGill team take over the two days training by discussion and group work  the main topics entertained during the two days were:-

  • Discussion on draft report performance in the last five years on Gender and language clubs at four ATVETs
  • How to sustain Gender and Language clubs in each College
  • On how to combat GBV at college using series Game design
  • Video sharing of Kenya and Ghana club experience
  • Photo voice show on female support program were facilitated by Professor Claudia from McGill University, Dr Lisa Starr, Hani Sadati & ICO Gender officer, Eleni.

Methods/Approaches

  • Group/ individual Exercise
  • Video experience sharing
  • Photo voice
  • Participatory and learner centered

Core Achievements’ of the training  

  • All Participants develop the skills of how to identify IGA using scientific research methods
  • Participants build up how to identify and implement gender-equitable and so

  and socially inclusive business practices

  • The participants also share experiences from similar sister organization on the sustainability of the clubs
  • Trainers develop the skills of a good business model and plan
  • Share experiences on draft report performance in five years on Gender and language clubs within ATVETs
  • Trainees were obtained Training completion Certificates at the end of the day by Mc Gill teams.   

    Lessons Learnt  from the Training

  • Gender & business training :- The training provides wide opportunities for the trainees to see critically each of their Income generating activities at the early stage based on research, using variety of Business model and Gender equitable mainstreaming strategy.  

ATTSVE Year 5 Gender Training – January 23 – 27, 2019

ATTSVE Year 5 Gender Training – January 23 – 27, 2019

In the last days of January 2019, once again, Adama city in Ethiopia was the host for a gender training session organized by the ATTSVE project. The participants were instructors of four Agriculture Technical Vocational Education and Training (ATVET) colleges from Nedjo, Maichew, Wolaita Soddo, and Woreta. Fifteen people, including ATVETs Gender Focal Persons and Language Club Coordinators, came together in a Four-and-Half-day workshop to share experience, put in practice their campus-based gender promoting activities, and give/receive feedback to/from their colleagues. Two professors from McGill University’s Faculty of Education (Prof. Claudia Mitchell & Dr. Lisa Starr), ATTSVE project’s coordinator in Canada (Sadaf Farookhi), ATTSVE project’s Gender Officer (Eleni Negash), and a PhD Candidate from McGill Faculty of Education (Hani Sadati) facilitated the sessions throughout the workshop.

On day one and half of the day two, Hani Sadati, with Kirubel Girma, of Dedicated 5 (D5) game design team, administered a Participatory Game Design workshop with a focus on addressing campus-based sexual and gender-based violence. In this workshop, the ATVET instructors learned about concepts of game-based learning, saw samples of serious games, became familiar with main elements/steps of game-creating process, made a sample of a board game, developed scenarios for SGBV issues and solutions, and contributed to designing the scenarios of a serious game, which aims to combat SGBV in ATVET colleges.

In the second half of day two, Dr. Lisa Starr highlighted the role of Gender and Language clubs in ATTSVE project, their previous and current status, and articulated the plans for the future. She also described the schedule and activities for the rest of the workshop sessions.

Regarding the importance of sustainability in building instructors’ capacities, specifically at the time that the ATTSVE project is on its last year, this training session mostly was dedicated to developing instructors’ skills and proficiency in implementing and running campus-based activities to promote gender equity in ATVET colleges. In so doing, members of each ATVET selected a couple of working topics and specific types of activities to design and run workshops, called “Gender and Language in Practice”. They were supposed to plan the A to Z of an half-day-long workshop, including even the icebreakers and energizer activities. 

Photovoice, Role Play, and Drawing were samples of the activities that participants selected to work. These workshops were followed by feedback sessions, where instructors from other ATVETs as well as facilitators commented on the given designed workshop. This experience provided an opportunity for ATVET instructors to practice what they had learned during the previous sessions of training in ATTSVE project.

On Saturday, January 26, which was the 4th day of the training sessions, Participatory Visual Methods Guide & Gender-Based
Violence Toolkit
 was launched and hard copies of it were distributed among the participants.

The last day of the training sessions (Sunday, January 27) was devoted to Conference Planning by Dr. Lisa Starr and Dr. Claudia Mitchell and Closing Presentation by Eleni Negash. In the conference planning session, ATVET instructors discussed and planned for The Second National ATVET conference, which was held in Adama from Monday, January 28 to Wednesday, January 30.

Toolkit to Address Gender-based Violence in Agricultural Colleges in Ethiopia

Messages from females to females!

Messages from ATVETs' successful females to all females!

Don’t be shy! Be strong and have self-confidence!
Ambowha Asnakew
ICT and Library Coordinator, Woreta ATVET College
Education is power! Capacitate yourself!
Tadila Nebeb
Dean of the Woreta ATVET College
Be confident and speak freely in public!
Hiwot Tiloye
Student, Plant Science, Woreta ATVET College
Increase your confidence and your speaking skills!
Tamralech
Student, Plant Science, Woreta ATVET College
Be aware of your rights! Increase the awareness!
Asmoret Kidane
Instructor & Former Gender Focal Person, Maichew ATVET College
Be visionary! Work hard! Be hopeful!
Freweyni Kidane
Instructor & Gender Focal Person, Maichew ATVET College
Do not imagine yourself lower than males!
Nigisti Kebediom
Store house coordinator, Maichew ATVET College​
Study hard and do not go to night clubs!
Melkam Terefe
Student, Livestock Production, Maichew ATVET College​​
Study hard & be protected from early marriage!
Mebrahte Gebretsadik
Student, Natural Resource, Maichew ATVET College​​
Help to raise
awareness!
Burtukan Bayo
Instructor and Gender Club member, Nedjo ATVET College
Remember your
aims!
Nuriya Mohamud
Instructor and Gender Club member, Nedjo ATVET College
Focus more
on the study!
Ayantu Mengistu
Student, Natural Resource Management, Nedjo ATVET
Study
hard!
Meseret Fekede
Student, Natural Resource Management, Nedjo ATVET
Be strong and upgrade yourself!
Abebech Anja
HR Statics Organizer, Wolaita Soddo ATVET College
Have your own aims, work hard to achieve them and do not forget them!
Amsale Tefera
Instructor, Natural Resource Department, Wolaita Soddo ATVET College
Don’t pay attention to rumours and sayings in your environment!
Elleni Teklu
Student, Natural Resource Management, Wolaita Soddo ATVET College
Be strong!
Tarekua Sabsebe
Student, Natural Resource Management, Wolaita Soddo ATVET College

Mela Game

Mela is a serious game, that has been attached to the Agricultural Transformation Through Stronger Vocational Education (ATTSVE) Project. 

Mela is designed to be a self-educating tool for ATVET instructors to address SGBV. The aim is to create the real-life situations for instructors and transfer the knowledge of some strategies that they can use in their classes or on campus to contribute to decreasing the SGBV incidents or increasing the gender equality.​

Mela is a tool to support ATVET instructors to develop their capacity in addressing SGBV in their colleges and creating a safe learning environment for their students in general, and female students particularly.

Serious Games as Self-Educating Tools; A Case Study to Address SGBV
A Guide to Mela: A Serious Game to Combat Sexual and Gender-Based Violence on Agricultural Campuses

Forms and Documents

Gender Concepts

This includes all forms of violence that take place in and around colleges, campuses, and demonstration sites, including gender-based violence and sexual harassment.

Gender is a broad term that refers to the roles, behaviors, and attributes that any given society associates with femininity and masculinity. Gender is considered a socially constructed relation, with characteristics that are learned through socialization and that change over time. The terms male and female refer to biological sex, and the terms girl, boy, woman and man refer to dominant gender identities.

Is any undesirable act involving men and women, in which one sex (usually the women) are victims of physical, sexual and psychological harm, and the other (usually the male) are the perpetrators of the violent acts. These include intimidation, suffering coercion and/or deprivation of liberty within the family, or within the general community.

Gender norms are the social standards and expectations about how men and women should be and act. These rules are learned and often internalized early in life. These ideas are often so normalized that many people either are not consciously aware of them or consider them to be natural. Gender norms form the basis of stereotypes about gender identity in a particular society, culture, and community at any given point in time.

These are simplistic generalizations about the gender attributes, differences, and roles of women and men. Stereotypical ideas about men and women often reinforce the idea that women are inferior or less capable than men and are often used to justify gender discrimination. Stereotypes about men and women can be perpetuated through a variety of forms, including songs, advertising, stories, traditional proverbs, radio and television, as well as in theories, laws, and institutional practices.

Any type of violence committed by a current or former partner (spouse, girlfriend, boyfriend) in an intimate relationship against the other spouse or partner.

According to UNESCO (2015): 

a. an expression of stereotypes based on gender and gender inequalities in all of our societies 

b. includes all types of violence or threat of violence directed specifically against pupils because of their gender and/or affecting girls and boys disproportionately, as the case may be; 

c. may be of a physical, sexual or psychological nature and may take the form of intimidation, punishment, ostracism, corporal punishment, bullying, humiliation, degrading treatment, harassment and sexual abuse and exploitation; 

d. may be inflicted by pupils, teachers or members of the educational community and may occur: within the school grounds; in its outbuildings; on the way to school; or even beyond, during extracurricular activities or through the increasingly widespread use of ICTs (cyber-bullying, sexual harassment via mobile phones and so forth); 

e. may have serious long-term consequences, such as: loss of self-confidence, self-deprecation, deterioration of physical and mental health, early and unintended pregnancies, depression, poor academic results, absenteeism, dropout, development of aggressive behavior and so forth.

Sex refers to physical and biological characteristics and anatomy, including hormones, chromosomes, internal and external genitalia, including sexual reproductive systems. The terms male and female refer to biological sex.

It is unwanted sexual attention that intrudes on a person’s integrity. This includes requests for sexual favors, unwelcome or demeaning remarks, gestures or forcing. It is a form of discrimination and is about an abuse of power.

This includes physical and psychological forms of violence that use sexual acts or attempted sexual acts, regardless of the relationship between the perpetrator and survivor, including sexual assault, rape, intimate partner violence, and all forms of unwanted sexual contact.

This term includes both sex work (sex as paid work) as well as sex for other forms of exchange (gifts or services such as food, clothing, phone credit, alcohol or drugs, higher grades, school tuition, and rides). It does not necessarily involve a predetermined payment or gift but is often motivated by some form of material benefit and is often associated with gender inequalities in relation to poverty.

a. Physical, sexual and psychological violence occurring in the family, including battering, sexual abuse of female children in the household, dowry-related violence, marital rape, female genital mutilation and other traditional practices harmful to women, non-spousal violence and violence related to exploitation;

b. Physical, sexual, and psychological violence occurring within the general community or perpetrated by the state, including rape, sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation at work, in educational institutions and elsewhere, traff icking in women and forced prostitution (United Nations, 1993).

Gender outcomes are the result of a policy or strategy or development intervention and the implications of those outcomes for women, men, girls and/or boys. The outcomes may be positive, in terms of more gender equality or they may be negative.

The word ‘patriarchy’ literally means the rule of the father or the ‘patriarch’. Originally, it was used to describe a specific type of ‘male-dominated family’ a large household that included women, junior men, children, slaves and domestic servants all under the rule of one dominant man. Now it is used more generally to refer to male domination and the power relationships by which men dominate women. Patriarchy is a social system in which men and boys are considered superior, are valued more highly and have more rights and more control over resources and decision making than girls and women. In a patriarchal society, women are kept subordinate in a number of ways. Patriarchal structures have existed across time and in many different cultures.


Other Relevant Reports/Toolkits

Other Relevant Reports/Toolkits

Combatting Corruption through Participatory Video
Guidelines for Gender Mainstreaming in Agricultural Sector
A Handbook on Art-Making with Youth People to Address Gender-Based Violence
Cellphilming in Four ATVET Colleges - A Mirror, Reflecting Gender Issues in Ethiopia
Counselling Guidelines on Domestic Violence
Gender Club Guide - A Manual for Starting and Leading a Gender Club at Your Site in Ethiopia
Facilitator's Manual Competence Development Programme on Gender Mainstreaming
Gender Mainstreaming Resource PACK - A Practical Guide for Programming
Gender Mainstreaming - An Overview - UN Document
Gender Mainstreaming Toolkit for Teachers and Teacher Educators
Gender Strategy for the Education and Training Sector - Ethiopia Ministry of Education
Programme Guidance on Counselling for STI-HIV Prevention in Sexual and Reproductive Health Settings
Review of Agricultural Technical Vocational Education and Training (ATVET) in Africa - best practices
Sexual & Gender Based Violence in Africa - Key Issues for Programming
Teacher Training Manual on School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response
Teachers' Code of Professional Practice
What is Sexual Harassment.UN document
Trainer's Manual for Rape Trauma Counsellors in Kenya
Wake Up and Smell the Coffee!
USAID;Ethiopia: Gender
Advancing Gender Equality: Promising Practices
Leave No Women Behind
Agribusiness and Market Development Year Four Annual Report
Women's Lives and Challenges: Equality and Empowerment Since 2000
Feed the Future: Ethiopia
Communicating Gender for Rural Development; Integrating Gender in Communication for Development
A Practical Guide to Photovoic: Sharing Pictures, Telling Stories, and Changing Communities
Exploring the links: Female genital mutilation/cutting and early marriage
Learning Module: HIV/AIDS and Agriculture
The Agriculture Curriculum and Mainstreaming Gender and HIV & Aids: a guide for instructors
A Guide to Gender and Enset: A Documentary Film
Anti-Harasment Code of Conduct - Mekelle University
Building Health Policy and Systems Research Capacity on Intersectionality and Gender Equity
Gender Mainstreaming
Gender strategy toolkit; A direction for achieving gender equality in your organisation
Gender for All: Mainstreaming Gender in ATTSVE
14 Times A Woman; Indigenous Stories from the Heart
A Gender Audit Tool; GENDER EQUALITY AT HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN AFRICA